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LSST Telescope Modeling Overview

Sebag, Jacques
J. Andrew ; G. Angeli ; C. Araujo ; J. Barr ; S. Callahan ; M. Cho ; C. Claver ; F. Daruich ; W. Gressler ; E. Hileman ; M. Liang ; G. Muller ; D. Neill ; W. Schoening ; M. Warner ; O. Wiecha ; B. Xin ; Alfredo Orden Martinez ; Manuel Perezagua Aguado ; Luis García Marchena ; Ismael Ruiz de Argandoña
J. Sebag ; J. Andrew ; G. Angeli ; C. Araujo ; J. Barr ; S. Callahan ; M. Cho ; C. Claver ; F. Daruich ; W. Gressler ; E. Hileman ; M. Liang ; G. Muller ; D. Neill ; W. Schoening ; M. Warner ; O. Wiecha ; B. Xin ; Alfredo Orden Martinez ; Manuel Perezagua Aguado ; Luis García Marchena ; Ismael Ruiz de Argandoña; LSST telescope modeling overview. Proc. SPIE 9911, Modeling, Systems Engineering, and Project Management for Astronomy VI, 99112E (August 19, 2016); doi:10.1117/12.2233178.
Publication Date: 
Friday, August 19, 2016
Type: 
Conference Papers
SPIE
Citable: 
no
SPIE Proceedings
Volume: 
9911
Abstract: 
During this early stage of construction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), modeling has become a crucial system engineering process to ensure that the final detailed design of all the sub-systems that compose the telescope meet requirements and interfaces. Modeling includes multiple tools and types of analyses that are performed to address specific technical issues. Three-dimensional (3D) Computeraided Design (CAD) modeling has become central for controlling interfaces between subsystems and identifying potential interferences. The LSST Telescope dynamic requirements are challenging because of the nature of the LSST survey which requires a high cadence of rapid slews and short settling times. The combination of finite element methods (FEM), coupled with control system dynamic analysis, provides a method to validate these specifications. An overview of these modeling activities is reported in this paper including specific cases that illustrate its impact. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Publication-122
Reviewed Under: 
LSST Project Publication Policy
Bibtex reference: 
@proceeding{doi:10.1117/12.2233178, author = {Sebag, J. and Andrew, J. and Angeli, G. and Araujo, C. and Barr, J. and Callahan, S. and Cho, M. and Claver, C. and Daruich, F. and Gressler, W. and Hileman, E. and Liang, M. and Muller, G. and Neill, D. and Schoening, W. and Warner, M. and Wiecha, O. and Xin, B. and Orden Martinez, Alfredo and Perezagua Aguado, Manuel and García Marchena, Luis and Ruiz de Argandoña, Ismael}, title = { LSST telescope modeling overview }, journal = {Proc. SPIE}, volume = {9911}, number = {}, pages = {99112E-99112E-9}, abstract = { During this early stage of construction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), modeling has become a crucial system engineering process to ensure that the final detailed design of all the sub-systems that compose the telescope meet requirements and interfaces. Modeling includes multiple tools and types of analyses that are performed to address specific technical issues. Three-dimensional (3D) Computeraided Design (CAD) modeling has become central for controlling interfaces between subsystems and identifying potential interferences. The LSST Telescope dynamic requirements are challenging because of the nature of the LSST survey which requires a high cadence of rapid slews and short settling times. The combination of finite element methods (FEM), coupled with control system dynamic analysis, provides a method to validate these specifications. An overview of these modeling activities is reported in this paper including specific cases that illustrate its impact. }, year = {2016}, doi = {10.1117/12.2233178}, URL = { http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2233178}, eprint = {} }

Financial support for LSST comes from the National Science Foundation (NSF) through Cooperative Agreement No. 1258333, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515, and private funding raised by the LSST Corporation. The NSF-funded LSST Project Office for construction was established as an operating center under management of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).  The DOE-funded effort to build the LSST camera is managed by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC).
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 to promote the progress of science. NSF supports basic research and people to create knowledge that transforms the future.
NSF and DOE will continue to support LSST in its Operations phase. They will also provide support for scientific research with LSST data.   




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