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LSST mirror system status: from design to fabrication and integration

Araujo-Huack, Constanza
Sebag, J.; Liang, M.; Neill, D.; Muller, G.; Thomas, S.J.; Vucina, T.; Gressler, W. J.
Constanza Araujo-Hauck ; Jacques Sebag ; Ming Liang ; Douglas Neill ; Gary Muller, et al. " LSST mirror system status: from design to fabrication and integration ", Proc. SPIE 9906, Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes VI, 99060L (July 27, 2016); doi:10.1117/12.2232923; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2232923
Publication Date: 
Wednesday, July 27, 2016
Type: 
Conference Papers
SPIE
Tags: 
Citable: 
no
SPIE Proceedings
Volume: 
9906
Abstract: 
In the construction phase since 2014, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an 8.4 meter diameter wide-field (3.5 degrees) survey telescope located on the summit of Cerro Pachón in Chile. The reflective telescope uses an 8.4 m f/1.06 concave primary, an annular 3.4 m meniscus convex aspheric secondary and a 5.2 m concave tertiary. The primary and tertiary mirrors are aspheric surfaces figured from a monolithic substrate and referred to as the M1M3 mirror. This unique design offers significant advantages in the reduction of degrees of freedom, improved structural stiffness for the otherwise annular surfaces, and enables a very compact design. The three-mirror system feeds a threeelement refractive corrector to produce a 3.5 degree diameter field of view on a 64 cm diameter flat focal surface. This paper describes the current status of the mirror system components and provides an overview of the upcoming milestones including the mirror coating and the mirror system integrated tests prior to summit integration. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Publication-104
Reviewed Under: 
LSST Project Publication Policy
Bibtex reference: 
@proceeding{doi:10.1117/12.2232923, author = {Araujo-Hauck, Constanza and Sebag, Jacques and Liang, Ming and Neill, Douglas and Muller, Gary and Thomas, Sandrine J. and Vucina, Tomislav and Gressler, William J.}, title = { LSST mirror system status: from design to fabrication and integration }, journal = {Proc. SPIE}, volume = {9906}, number = {}, pages = {99060L-99060L-10}, abstract = { In the construction phase since 2014, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an 8.4 meter diameter wide-field (3.5 degrees) survey telescope located on the summit of Cerro Pachón in Chile. The reflective telescope uses an 8.4 m f/1.06 concave primary, an annular 3.4 m meniscus convex aspheric secondary and a 5.2 m concave tertiary. The primary and tertiary mirrors are aspheric surfaces figured from a monolithic substrate and referred to as the M1M3 mirror. This unique design offers significant advantages in the reduction of degrees of freedom, improved structural stiffness for the otherwise annular surfaces, and enables a very compact design. The three-mirror system feeds a threeelement refractive corrector to produce a 3.5 degree diameter field of view on a 64 cm diameter flat focal surface. This paper describes the current status of the mirror system components and provides an overview of the upcoming milestones including the mirror coating and the mirror system integrated tests prior to summit integration. }, year = {2016}, doi = {10.1117/12.2232923}, URL = { http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2232923}, eprint = {} }

Financial support for LSST comes from the National Science Foundation (NSF) through Cooperative Agreement No. 1258333, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515, and private funding raised by the LSST Corporation. The NSF-funded LSST Project Office for construction was established as an operating center under management of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).  The DOE-funded effort to build the LSST camera is managed by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC).
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 to promote the progress of science. NSF supports basic research and people to create knowledge that transforms the future.
NSF and DOE will continue to support LSST in its Operations phase. They will also provide support for scientific research with LSST data.   




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