Opening a Window of Discovery on the Dynamic Universe

Telescope

April 2017

The LSST secondary mirror (M2) system has completed another big milestone, with successful demonstration of closed-loop mirror control. The Harris team accomplished this using the aluminum surrogate mirror integrated into the cell assembly.  Meanwhile, the mirror substrate is being prepared for its “first light optical test” in July at Harris in Rochester, NY, with the successful bonding of all actuator pads.

Credit: 
LSST Project / NSF / AURA
June 2016
24 Gold Inter Loop Controllers, configured for controlling the LSST M2 axial actuators
Credit: 
LSST Project Office
May 2016
A completed deck plate manufactured by Tucson vendor CAID Industries who is building our M1 M3 mirror cell.
Credit: 
LSST Project
November 2015
Super detailed, high resolution cut-away render of the facility model showing the inner workings. Zoom in on this one; it's worth a closer look.
Credit: 
LSST Project/J. Andrew
November 2015
Render of the telescope model in the zenith position.
Credit: 
LSST Project/J. Andrew
November 2015
High resolution render of the facility model.
Credit: 
LSST Project/J. Andrew
November 2015
Super detailed, high resolution cut-away render of the telescope model showing the inner workings. Zoom in on this one; it's worth a closer look.
Credit: 
LSST Project/J. Andrew
December 2013
A three dimensional rendering of the baseline design of the dome with a cutaway to show the telescope within.
Credit: 
LSST Project Office
September 2013
A three dimensional rendering of the baseline design for the LSST in a side view with the telescope pointed at about 45 degrees of elevation. The 8.4-meter LSST will use a special three-mirror design, creating an exceptionally wide field of view, and will have the ability to survey the entire sky in only three nights.
Credit: 
LSST Project Office
September 2013
A three dimensional rendering of the baseline design for the LSST with the telescope pointed at about 45 degrees of elevation.
Credit: 
LSST Project Office
September 2013
A three dimensional rendering of the baseline design for the LSST with the telescope pointed towards zenith.
Credit: 
LSST Project Office
September 2013
A three dimensional rendering of the baseline design for the LSST with the telescope pointed towards zenith.
Credit: 
LSST Project Office

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Financial support for LSST comes from the National Science Foundation (NSF) through Cooperative Agreement No. 1258333, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515, and private funding raised by the LSST Corporation. The NSF-funded LSST Project Office for construction was established as an operating center under management of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).  The DOE-funded effort to build the LSST camera is managed by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC).
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 to promote the progress of science. NSF supports basic research and people to create knowledge that transforms the future.   




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