Opening a Window of Discovery on the Dynamic Universe

Data

October 2015

Data Management Team Boot Camp, October 5-7, 2015, took place at three locations simultaneously. Tucson Project Office: A. Abate (UA), F. Economou (LSST), J. Sick (LSST), R. Owen (UW),  J M. Peterson (LSST), D. Nidever (LSST), A. Fausti (LSST), T. Jenness (LSST); Princeton: H-F Chiang (NCSA), V. Kasliwal (University of Pennsylvania & Princeton), J. Swinbank (Princeton), J. Garmilla (Princeton), L. MacArthur (Princeton), M.Fisher-Levine (BNL): University of Washington: D. Reiss (UW), Y. AlSayyad (UW), I. Sullivan (UW), B. Abel (UW), N. Pease (SLAC), C. Slater (UW)

Credit: 
LSST
June 2015

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) database team has developed an innovative “overlapping partitioning” method for storing enormous amounts of information for rapid access. By overlapping equally sized packets of information in the partitioned sphere, searching for nearest neighbor sources becomes quick and efficient. Further, the technique has been shown to work just as efficiently with increasingly complex systems. The improved algorithms resulting from this innovative architecture will be available as open source software that can be used by a broad spectrum of fields to transform access to large databases.

Credit: 
LSST
January 2013
The data management system begins at the data acquisition interface between the camera and telescope subsystems and flows through to the data products accessed by end users. On the way, it moves through three types of managed facilities supporting data management, as well as end user sites that may conduct science using LSST data or pipeline resources on their own computing infrastructure.
Credit: 
LSST Project Office
January 2011
The pipelines process the images to produce the catalogs, which are then made accessible to the community via open interfaces in a Virtual Observatory model. Since new data is being collected nightly throughout the LSST's 10-year survey period, and scientific algorithms will evolve during this time frame, significant re-processing will occur. This must be taken into account in sizing the LSST technology resources and making the LSST middleware easily extendable.
Credit: 
LSST Project Office
January 2010
The LSST image simulator produces 'end-to-end' image simulations to verify the scientific performance of the complete LSST system design. This color image, a composite of three individual frames with different filters, shows one 4Kx4K CCD (13x13 arcminutes of sky) out of 189 CCDs in the LSST focal plane. It corresponds to only 2.6 parts per million of LSST's ultimate sky coverage of 20,000 square degrees.
Credit: 
LSST

Financial support for LSST comes from the National Science Foundation (NSF) through Cooperative Agreement No. 1258333, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515, and private funding raised by the LSST Corporation. The NSF-funded LSST Project Office for construction was established as an operating center under management of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).  The DOE-funded effort to build the LSST camera is managed by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC).
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 to promote the progress of science. NSF supports basic research and people to create knowledge that transforms the future.   




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