Opening a Window of Discovery on the Dynamic Universe

Camera

September 2015
This exploded view of the LSST’s digital camera highlights its various components, including lenses, shutter and filters.
Credit: 
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
February 2015
This image shows the mirror's optics as well as the lenses in the camera, the filter placement, and the associated point spread functions.
Credit: 
LSST
September 2014
A baseline design rendering of the LSST Camera with a cut away to show the inner workings.
Credit: 
SLAC / LSST Project Office
September 2014
A baseline design rendering of the LSST Camera with a cut away to show the inner workings.
Credit: 
SLAC / LSST Project Office
September 2014
A baseline design rendering of the LSST Camera with a cut away to show the inner workings.
Credit: 
SLAC/LSST Project Office
September 2014
A baseline design rendering of the LSST Camera with a cut away to show the inner workings.
Credit: 
SLAC/LSST Project Office
January 2011
The LSST camera is designed to provide a wide field of view with better than 0.2 arcsecond sampling and spectral sampling in five or more bands from 400nm to 1060nm. The image surface is flat with a diameter of approximately 64 cm. The detector format will be a circular mosaic providing over 3 Gigapixels per image. The camera includes a filter mechanism and, if necessary, shuttering capability. The camera is positioned in the middle of the telescope.
Credit: 
LSST
January 2011
The LSST camera is designed to provide a wide field of view with better than 0.2 arcsecond sampling and spectral sampling in five or more bands from 400nm to 1060nm. The image surface is flat with a diameter of approximately 64 cm. The detector format will be a circular mosaic providing over 3 Gigapixels per image. The camera includes a filter mechanism and, if necessary, shuttering capability. The camera is positioned in the middle of the telescope.
Credit: 
LSST
January 2011
Diagram of cryostat assembly in cross-section with labels.
Credit: 
LSST
August 2011
Credit: 
LSST
January 2010
The LSST camera has 63-cm diameter focal place and 3.2 billion pixels of 0.2 arcseconds per pixel. Six filters are available, ugrizy, with 5 in the filter wheel at any given time.
Credit: 
Todd Mason, Mason Productions Inc. / LSST Corporation
January 2010
The optical elements of the LSST appear suspended over the coplanar primary/tertiary mirror. The secondary mirror, camera lenses and filters are also visible.
Credit: 
Todd Mason, Mason Productions Inc. / LSST Corporation
July 2010
Kirk Gilmore holds a silicon wafer with operating CCDs, and Paul O'Connor holds a model 3x3 CCD module with integral electronics. LSST's focal plane will be populated by 189 novel CCD imagers.
Credit: 
LSST
July 2010
Credit: 
LSST
July 2010
Suzanne Jacoby with the LSST focal plane array scale model. The array's diameter is 64 cm. This mosaic will provide over 3 Gigapixels per image. The image of the moon (30 arcminutes) is placed there for scale of the Field of View.
Credit: 
LSST

Financial support for LSST comes from the National Science Foundation (NSF) through Cooperative Agreement No. 1258333, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515, and private funding raised by the LSST Corporation. The NSF-funded LSST Project Office for construction was established as an operating center under management of the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA).  The DOE-funded effort to build the LSST camera is managed by the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC).
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 to promote the progress of science. NSF supports basic research and people to create knowledge that transforms the future.   




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